Dec 152014
 

Thomas Jefferson became one of my heroes when I was 13 years old. So you’d think I’d enjoy hearing people say good things about him, but very often, I don’t. My reason is simple: the people who praise Jefferson seldom really understand him, and if they did, it’s questionable that they’d like him. (Others try to get rid of him by trashing his reputation.)

What People Don’t Know

A crucial thing people don’t know about Jefferson is this: he was fully convinced that freedom in America was fatally wounded—in fact on its deathbed—by 1810 or so. He maintained that he and his fellow founders had blown their opportunity and that American freedom had already slipped away.

Now, since what I’ve written above will seem almost inconceivable to many Americans, let me back it up by quoting a few of Jefferson’s letters:

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Nov 072014
 

Expressing their obvious contempt for the overall situation in America, voters played their latest game of musical chairs by putting Republicans back in charge of Congress.

It won’t make any difference at all. That’s because the Republicans who have been installed into power are as statist as the Democrats they are replacing.

What really matters with respect to a free society is not a new set of statists to replace an old set of statists. That’s one of the things that distinguish libertarians from statists. Libertarians understand that the problem in the United States is a structural one, not one involving getting “better” people into public office.

What is that structural problem? Libertarians refer to it as the welfare-warfare state. It involves enormous apparatuses that, many decades ago, statists attached onto our original governmental system in America.

The welfare-state apparatus is based on the concept of mandatory charity. The federal government forces people to be good and caring toward others. The income tax and the IRS are the primary means by which this is accomplished. The federal government taxes people and gives the money to others who the government deems need the money more.

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Aug 042014
 

As an apparently war-minded people, Americans (or at least, our American political leaders) have been comfortable framing parts of the domestic policy agenda as wars for decades. Two of the most prominent have been the War on Poverty and the War on Drugs.

Despite the similarity in their names, there is an important difference between the two. The War on Poverty is not a real war. The War on Drugs is.

The War on Poverty is not a real war because there is no enemy that we are attacking to fight poverty. Quite the opposite. The War on Poverty identifies poor people and them gives them stuff. Sometimes it is income. Other times it is food, or health care, or education.

If some analogy to war is made, the War on Poverty is more like the Marshall Plan that provided aid to the victims of war regardless of any fault in causing the war. If people are victims of poverty, the War on Poverty gives them stuff, perhaps with the idea that the stuff can help them escape poverty.

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Jul 302014
 

#9 – Human Rights Are More Important Than Property Rights

It is not the right of property which is protected, but the right to property. Property, per se, has no rights; but the individual—the man—has three great rights, equally sacred from arbitrary interference: the right to his life, the right to his liberty, the right to his property…. The three rights are so bound together as to be essentially one right. To give a man his life but deny him his liberty, is to take from him all that makes his life worth living. To give him his liberty but take from him the property which is the fruit and badge of his liberty, is to still leave him a slave. 

—U.S. Supreme Court Justice George Sutherland

Tricky phrases with favorable meanings and emotional appeal are being used today to imply a distinction between property rights and human rights.

By implication, there are two sets of rights—one belonging to human beings and the other to property. Since human beings are more important, it is natural for the unwary to react in favor of human rights.

Actually, there is no such distinction between property rights and human rights. The term property has no significance except as it applies to something owned by someone. Property itself has neither rights nor value, except as human interests are involved. There are no rights but human rights, and what are spoken of as property rights are only the human rights of individuals to property.

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Jul 162014
 

“Countless people … will hate the new world order … and will die protesting against it.” — H.G. Wells, The New World Order (1940)

Throughout our lives and throughout our culture, we are conditioned to rally around concepts of false division. We are led to believe that Democrats and Republicans are separate and opposing parties, yet they are actually two branches of the same political-control mechanism. We are led to believe that two nations such as the United States and Russia are geopolitical enemies, when, in fact, they are two puppet governments under the dominance of the same international financiers. Finally, we are told that the international bankers themselves are somehow separated by borders and philosophies, when the reality is all central banks answer to a singular authority: the Bank Of International Settlements (BIS).

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Jun 022014
 

If you attend any conservative conference, I will guarantee you that you will encounter the following mantra countless times: “free enterprise, private property, and limited government.” You will hear it in speeches, read it in brochures, hear it in casual conversations, and see it prominently displayed at exhibit booths. It is the guiding mantra of the conservative movement.

There is just one big problem with that popular conservative mantra: The policies and programs that conservatives embrace and support violate the mantra.

Let’s look at some examples.

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Sep 232013
 

For whatever reason, libertarianism has been getting the cudgel treatment in the media lately. The leading voice of the attackers seems to be Michael Lind of Salon who can’t help giddying himself with Ayn Rand bashing, despite the foregone author’s animosity for libertarians. For all their verbal chops, the enemies of true human liberty consistently misinterpret that which they profess to loathe. It’s all par for the course considering the decrepit state of modern intellectual discourse. But logical inconsistency has a way of burrowing itself in the mind, irritating the very means by which we formulate thoughts and ideas. Sometimes it just begs for a sharp response.

One of the recent forays into debunking libertarianism comes from the unapologetically progressive AlterNet.org. Writer-consultant RJ Eskow is convinced he has found the weak spot of adherents to peace and freedom. In a diatribe consisting of eleven questions, the fellow Randite-hater attempts to establish a criterion for vetting self-styled libertarians. The net of hypocrisy in which he wishes to entangle his opponents is framed as a silver bullet to bring down the beast of unfettered capitalism. As is almost always the case, the trap is frayed and littered with dishonest characterizations.

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Sep 062013
 

I can hear the exclamations now: “Whoa! Wait a cussed minute, Longstreet!” How EVER did you come up with that idea, huh?”

It’s not exactly an Idea. It’s more like a fact. In fact, it IS a FACT!

All America has accomplished, so far, anyway, is to “wall” ourselves in. Heck, we have barely scratched the enemy, the terrorists. Each week, or so, we take out a few desert dwelling bomb-makers and terrorists out in the wilderness of the Middle East with Hellfire missiles from a circling drone, pat ourselves on the back, and then go right back to monitoring the phone calls, and email of American citizens.

The average American citizen has had far more freedom taken from him, denied him, refused him, since the so-called War on Terror was declared than any of the countries aiding and abetting the terrorists themselves.

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Sep 042013
 

At the very edge of oblivion, some men reflect; others snivel and cry. I have spent many years now studying the societal strengths and failings of modern American culture, and I have to say that most citizens within our once grand Republic will do far less reflecting and much more crying when the bell tolls. This is not to say that I believe the fight is lost. Far from it. In fact, I would consider myself an optimist amongst many of my peers in the liberty movement as to our chances of defending Constitutional freedom today. There is a very strong core within our country that still embraces the ideals of individualism and independence. The problem is that those who are awake face each day surrounded by lunatics and the giggling blind. It’s difficult to find solace within the asylum of the “mainstream,” so we begin to assume we are alone.

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Sep 022013
 

With the recent media-hyped controversy over whether or not Ron Paul is racist, I thought I would record my two cents here for anyone who cares. I’ll let others hash out the journalistic digging of the facts in other forums, but suffice it to say for my purposes here that my own digging has satisfied my belief that Ron Paul is not racist. I’m not interested in arguing with anyone who disagrees, but I am simply going to state here why both Martin Luther King Jr. and Ron Paul are both inspirations to me.

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