Jun 132014
 

Just how dumb are Americans? The evidence appears to be mounting by the day. If it’s not people who think Godzilla is real in California, then it’s the ultra-nationalists who think the United States flag should be worshiped as a religious cult idol.

No matter what, I cant seem to escape the fucking stupidity! It’s as if I’m living out the plot to the Mike Judge movie, Idiocracy. All I need to for it to be reality is a T.V. show actually titled “Ow My Balls!” and then I will be convinced that Mike Judge is a true prophet.

So, why am I ranting now? I’ll tell you why, it’s because I’m sick of stupid people… I’m sick of shallow minded morons who know how to swipe a credit card and tout their idiocy on social media, but cant hold an intelligent conversation (let alone an intellectual thought) if their lives depended on it.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Apr 302014
 

“[The aim of public education is not] to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence. . . . Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim . . . is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States…”—Henry Mencken, American Journalist (April 1924)

How do you persuade a nation of relatively freedom-loving individuals to march in lock step with a police state? You start by convincing them that they’re in danger, and only the government can protect them. Keep them keyed up with constant danger alerts, and the occasional terrorist incident, whether real or staged. Distract them with wall-to-wall news coverage about sinking ships, disappearing planes and pseudo-celebrities spouting racist diatribes. Use blockbuster movies, reality shows and violent video games to hype them up on military tactics, and then while they’re distracted and numb to all that is taking place around them, indoctrinate their young people to your way of thinking, relying primarily on the public schools and popular culture.

After all, public education the world over has always been the vehicle for statist propaganda of one sort or another, whether it’s religion, militarism, democracy or totalitarianism, and America is no exception. In fact, today’s public schools, far from being bastions of free speech, are merely microcosms of the world beyond the schoolhouse gates, and increasingly, it’s a world hostile to freedom.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Nov 182013
 

To inform people is hard slugging. Everything is lined up against the public being informed, or the policymakers for that matter. News is contaminated by its service to special interests and hidden agendas. Many scientists or their employers are dependent on federal money. Even psychologists and anthropologists were roped into the government’s torture and occupation programs. Economists tell lies for corporations and Wall Street. Plant and soil scientists tell lies for agribusiness and Monsanto. Truth tellers are slandered and persecuted. However, persistence can eventually win out. In the long-run, truth sometimes emerges. But not always. And not always in time.

I have been trying to inform the American people, economists, and policymakers for more than a decade about the adverse impacts of jobs offshoring on the US economy. The word has eventually gotten out. Last week I was contacted by 8th grade students competing for their school in CSPAN’s StudentCam Documentary Contest. They want to interview me on the subject of jobs offshoring for their documentary film.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Nov 062013
 

“Five percent of the people think;
ten percent of the people think they think;
and the other eighty-five percent would rather die than think.”

- Thomas Edison

The kabuki theater that passes for governance in Washington D.C. reveals the profound level of ignorance shrouding this Empire of Debt in its prolonged death throes. Ignorance of facts; ignorance of math; ignorance of history; ignorance of reality; and ignorance of how ignorant we’ve become as a nation, have set us up for an epic fall. It’s almost as if we relish wallowing in our ignorance like a fat lazy sow in a mud hole. The lords of the manor are able to retain their power, control and huge ill-gotten riches because the government educated serfs are too ignorant to recognize the self-evident contradictions in the propaganda they are inundated with by state controlled media on a daily basis.

“Any formal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to defend their most precious possession – their ignorance.” - Hendrik Willem van Loon

Continue reading »

Share Button
Aug 142013
 

“Is it surprising that prisons resemble factories, schools, barracks, hospitals, which all resemble prisons?” – Michel Foucault

Once upon a time in America, parents breathed a sigh of relief when their kids went back to school after a summer’s hiatus, content in the knowledge that for a good portion of the day their kids would be gainfully occupied, out of harm’s way and out of trouble. Those were the good old days, before school shootings became a part of our national lexicon and schools, aiming for greater security, transformed themselves into quasi-prisons, complete with surveillance cameras, metal detectors, police patrols, zero tolerance policies, lock downs, drug sniffing dogs and strip searches.

Continue reading »

Share Button
May 062013
 

Dr. Roche is Director of Seminars for the Foundation for Economic Education. He has taught history and philosophy in college and maintains a special interest in American education.

In what must surely be his most quoted remark, the nineteenth cen­tury novelist, Thomas Peacock, commented that anyone talking about education was the bore of all bores since his subject lacked a beginning, a middle, or an end. Anyone attempting to write on the subject would seem, therefore, to undertake a difficult assign­ment. Yet, what other topic has had so much written about it, so little of which is read? With his usual blunt Yankee insight, Emer­son summed up the current atti­tude on such treatises:

It is ominous, a presumption of crime, that this word Education has so cold, so hopeless a sound. A trea­tise on education, a convention for education, a lecture, a system, affects us with slight paralysis and a cer­tain yawning of the jaws.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Apr 102013
 

“There’s a tremendous push where if the kid’s behavior is thought to be quote-unquote abnormal — if they’re not sitting quietly at their desk — that’s pathological, instead of just childhood.”—Dr. Jerome Groopman, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School

According to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control, a staggering 6.4 million American children between the ages of 4 and 17 have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), whose key symptoms are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity—characteristics that most would consider typically childish behavior. High school boys, an age group particularly prone to childish antics and drifting attention spans, are particularly prone to being labeled as ADHD, with one out of every five high school boys diagnosed with the disorder.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Mar 012013
 

Let’s try to unmask and decipher a few things right now, and to make things a bit easier, let’s also take as our example a topic that is front and center stage politically at the time of this writing. In order to get there, however, we’ll have to provide some background.

John and Jane and their baby Adam all live together in Anytown, USA, and have, by any modern standards, what most would consider a decent life. They are not affluent, but nor are they abjectly poor, and so manage to have a modest house in a suburban neighborhood, and a pair of used economy cars in order to get back and forth to work. For of course, unlike the majority of their parents’ lives – and certainly unlike their grandparents’ entire lives – both John and Jane must work full-time. Inflation, brought on by government’s acquiescence to the Federal Reserve’s fiat currency creation scheme, coupled with the high rates of taxation this fosters in turn – all while government expands in size and scope to accommodate the welfare-warfare state it has become during the past century of its existence – have made this necessary. During the era of both of Adam’s grandmothers’ working lives, the idea of both parents working was sold to the public as “Women’s Liberation,” but it was actually closer to enslavement: It got former housewives onto the income and Social Security tax rolls, away from the family, and government has never been the same.

Continue reading »

Share Button
Oct 182012
 

“[P]ublic school reform is now justified in the dehumanizing language of national security, which increasingly legitimates the transformation of schools into adjuncts of the surveillance and police state… students are increasingly subjected to disciplinary apparatuses which limit their capacity for critical thinking, mold them into consumers, test them into submission, strip them of any sense of social responsibility and convince large numbers of poor minority students that they are better off under the jurisdiction of the criminal justice system than by being valued members of the public schools.”—Professor Henry Giroux

For those hoping to better understand how and why we arrived at this dismal point in our nation’s history, where individual freedoms, privacy and human dignity have been sacrificed to the gods of security, expediency and corpocracy, look no farther than America’s public schools.

Once looked to as the starting place for imparting principles of freedom and democracy to future generations, America’s classrooms are becoming little more than breeding grounds for compliant citizens. The moment young people walk into school, they increasingly find themselves under constant surveillance: they are photographed, fingerprinted, scanned, x-rayed, sniffed and snooped on. Between metal detectors at the entrances, drug-sniffing dogs in the hallways and surveillance cameras in the classrooms and elsewhere, many of America’s schools look more like prisons than learning facilities.

Continue reading »

Share Button